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Most microbiology lab managers and PIs purchase jars to run experiments, rather than purchase an anaerobic workstation.

Most microbiology lab managers and PIs purchase jars to run experiments, rather than purchase an anaerobic workstation.


The up-front cost to use jars is low compared with a workstation, and since the jars can be reused for years, it is common to assume that they are cheaper over time as well. But have you considered the cost of consumables?

Unit prices for gas packs and anaerobic indicator strips are relatively inexpensive, but when you run a high volume of jars each week, these costs can really add up. But what is a “high volume?” At what point can your lab save enough on consumables to pay for the cost of a workstation over time?

Now a new infographic is available that can help you decide if an anaerobic workstation is right for your lab. Find the number of jars your lab runs each week, and check the corresponding bar to learn whether using jars makes good financial sense – or whether you should ditch your jars altogether.

When you consider a workstation’s space-saving convenience and a tightly-controlled, continuously-anaerobic atmosphere during incubation, your lab may benefit from a workstation even if you need to pay a little more each year – say, a few hundred dollars.

See the Infographic

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